Sugar Consumption Data for Small Children

Over the weekend, Kirsten Herrick, an epidemiologist for the National Center for Health Statistics, presented data from 2011-2014 on the consumption of added sugars in U.S. children aged 6 – 23 months.  The results are startling:  toddlers between 12 and 18 months averaged 5.5 teaspoons per day, while those between 19 and 23 months averaged 7.1 teaspoons per day.  The latter exceeds the limit of 6 teaspoons set by the American Heart Association for adult women.
These figures are particularly troubling because high childhood sugar consumption adversely affects cognition (and hence school work), and it has been linked to obesity, asthma, diabetes, tooth decay, and possibly infectious disease.  Moreover, once a child has developed a sweet tooth, it becomes harder to adopt more healthful eating habits later in life.
One way for parents to help reduce their children’s sugar consumption is to limit soft drinks, fruit juices, and other sweetened beverages.  Desserts should be reserved for special occasions, and not be a component of every meal. Children should be taught to make better choices during snack time and in the school cafeteria.  Only in this way can we reverse the bitter trend.
The original study is here:
https://www.eventscribe.com/2018/Nutrition2018/fsPopup.asp?Mode=presInfo&PresentationID=405508

Few Preschoolers Meet Anti-Obesity Guidelines

Obesity has long been a serious health issue in America, with 36.5% of adults now meeting the CDC’s definition.  Since preschool children who are overweight face four times the risk of being overweight as adults, the state of Maine and Harvard University have devised guidelines for children known as “5-2-1-0.”  This concept recommends that children eat 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily, get no more than 2 hours of screen time, perform at least 1 hour of physical activity, and drink 0 sweetened beverages.
A study conducted by the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center has found, however, that among the 398 children observed during a 24 hour period, only one child met all of the guidelines.  Less than 1% met the guideline for exercise; 17% failed to get emough fruits and vegetables; 50% had sugary drinks; and 19% spent too much time in front of a screen.  According to the researchers, a quarter of the children in the study were already overweight.
This study points toward parents as having a great responsibility in ensuring better future health outcomes for their children.  The findings were published in Preventive Medicine Reports.  You can find the article here:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211335517301304